Signs and Evidence

Making clinical sense of scientific data

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Anorexia

Cholecystitis
 Positive likelihood ratio
1.40 ( Trowbridge RL et al. )
(average) 1.4
Negative likelihood ratio
0.70 ( Trowbridge RL et al. )
(average) 0.7
Appendicitis
 Positive likelihood ratio
3.17 ( Idris SA et al. )
1.05 ( Al-gaithy Zuhoor K et )
(average) 2.11
Negative likelihood ratio
0.07 ( Idris SA et al. )
0.53 ( Al-gaithy Zuhoor K et )
(average) 0.3
Temporal Arteritis
 Positive likelihood ratio
0.95 ( Ryan D et al. )
(average) 0.95
Negative likelihood ratio
1.03 ( Ryan D et al. )
(average) 1.03
Otitis media acuta
 Positive likelihood ratio
1.06 ( Wood JM et al. )
(average) 1.06
Negative likelihood ratio
0.97 ( Wood JM et al. )
(average) 0.97


Sources used:

1.Trowbridge RL et al. Does This Patient Have Acute Cholecystitis? JAMA, January 1, 2003—Vol 289, No. 1 80-86
2.Idris SA et al. The sensitivity and specificity of the conventional symptoms and signs in making adiagnosis of acute appendicitis. Sudan journal of medical sciences. 4. 55-61
3.Al-gaithy Zuhoor K et al. Clinical value of total white blood cells and neutrophil counts in patients with suspected appendicitis: retrospective study. World Journal of Emergency Surgery : WJES. 2012;7:32
4.Ryan D et al. Management of the Patient with Suspected Temporal Arteritis. Ophthalmology 2005;112:744–756
5.Wood JM et al. Acute otitis media in young children Diagnosis and management. Medicine Today 2014; 15(7): 12-2